Monthly Archives: August 2020

Partying in Latin America: Las Fiestas

We’re keeping things fun here on the Spanish blog this month. Be sure to check out the posts about partying in Spanish and Carnaval if you missed them. Hoy voy a escribir sobre las fiestas en América Latina (Today I’m going to write about the parties in Latin America). In my travels across the region these past three years, I’ve attended some really fun fiestas and I’m excited to share some of them with you! From salsa bars to national holidays to music festivals, there’s always something exciting going on.

México

Hay muchas fiestas increíbles en México (There are many amazing parties in Mexico). Mexicans don’t really need an excuse to party, but they’ve got plenty of them! The country has many different holidays and festivals throughout the year.

One of the most important is el Día de la Independencia de México (Mexico’s Independence Day), which is celebrated on September 16th. Hay desfiles, conciertos, fiestas y más (There are parades, concerts, parties, and more). This is a fiesta that actually goes on for a few days!

¡Viva México!

On the night of the 15th, crowds gather in the main square to hear “El Grito de Dolores” (The Cry of Dolores) – the famous call for independence given by Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla in 1810. Everyone in the crowd joins in chanting “¡Viva México!” (Long live Mexico!).

The party really gets going after that, with los fuegos artificiales y la música de mariachi (fireworks and mariachi music). Por supuesto, también hay mucha cerveza y comida deliciosa (Of course, there’s also plenty of beer and delicious food).

You can read all about Mexico’s Independence Day in this post and check out a video highlight of the celebrations in Puerto Vallarta here:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5izysoDhTXw?feature=oembed&w=500&h=281]

 

Guatemala

The small city of Antigua, Guatemala is famous for its processions during Semana Santa (Holy Week). Las procesiones de Semana Santa en Antigua son las más grandes del mundo (The Holy Week processions in Antigua are the largest in the world).

In these processions, large groups carry andas (altars) that depict scenes from the Bible. People work tirelessly to decorate alfombras (carpets) on the cobblestone streets made of flowers, sawdust, fruit, and pine needles. People travel from all over the world to be a part of this very festive occasion.

Carefully making the alfombras.

While the Easter celebrations in Antigua are very well known, you may be surprised to find out that this small, conservative city in Guatemala is also home to quite the underground party scene!

Hay muchos bares en Antigua, pero cierran temprano (There are many bars in Antigua, but they close early). Some close as early as 11 PM while even the “late night” places only stay open until 1. So where do all the party animals go once the clock strikes one?

Todos los sábados hay una fiesta en la piscina (Every Saturday, there is a party in a pool). This isn’t your typical pool party, though, as there’s no water! The party, known locally as El Santo Perdido (The Lost Saint) is basically a rave in an empty pool. It goes all night long and attracts a mix of locals, expats, and tourists.

Mansion party!

Una vez al mes, también hay una fiesta en la mansión (Once a month, there’s also a mansion party). This mansion is about halfway between Antigua and Guatemala City. It’s up on a hill and offers some tremendous views of the capital in the distance.

The mansion fiesta is an actual pool party during the day and it transforms into a bumping dance party at night. Hardcore party-goers stay to watch el amanecer (the sunrise) before heading home to catch some much needed z’s. It’s definitely one of the most fun fiestas I’ve ever been to!

 

Costa Rica

En Costa Rica, fui a un festival de música internacional y a un festival local (In Costa Rica, I went to an international music festival and a local festival). The Envision Festival takes place in the small town of Uvita on the southwest coast. It’s gotten quite big and attracts a large crowd from all corners of the globe.

Actually, it’s not just a music festival. It’s also very focused on yoga, art, sustainability, and surfing. Hay muchas clases y talleres durante el día (There are many classes and workshops during the day).

Sunset on the beach.

Later in the day, a large crowd gathers on the beach for el atardecer (the sunset). It’s quite the sight to behold, with drum circles, fire twirlers, and much more. La música iba hasta el amanecer cada noche (The music went until sunrise every night). I didn’t make it that late but I still had a blast at Envision! You can get a little taste of what this festival is like in this video:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmxWjH1hLn0?feature=oembed&w=500&h=281]

De la playa viajamos a las montañas (From the beach, we traveled to the mountains). Specifically, we went to the town of La Fortuna. It’s a beautiful place and one of the most popular destinations in Costa Rica.

La Fortuna tiene volcanes, cascadas, un hermoso lago y mucho más (La Fortuna has volcanoes, waterfalls, a beautiful lake, and much more). While we were in town, there just so happened to be a local festival going on. One night, we went outside to find a bunch of vaqueros (cowboys) parading through the streets on horseback.

Cowboy party!

After asking around, we learned that there was actually a whole carnival in town for the occasion. There were rides and games for the kids as well as a packed bar with live music for the grown-ups. Best of all, there was even a rodeo! I had never been to one and had so much fun. ¡Los ticos son gente muy amable y divertida! (The Ticos are very friendly and fun people!). Be sure to check out my post about traveling in Costa Rica if you missed it.

 

¿Has estado en una buena fiesta en América Latina?
Have you been to a good party in Latin America?

The post Partying in Latin America: Las Fiestas first appeared on Spanish Language Blog.

Spanish Words of Foreign Origin: Germanismos (Part 1)

Image taken from Pixabay.com

There are two kinds of germanismos: those words having its roots way back into the past, that is to say the Germanic languages from yesteryear (Frankish, Gothic…); and those coming from the relatively modern German language, be it Old High German or its modern, standardized version spoken today in Germany, Austria or Switzerland.

The lexicon of Germanic origin used today in Spanish encompasses from names of everyday objects and actions to specialized jargon, like from Chemistry terminology.

Blanco: From Germanic blanka, it means “white” in Spanish. The original meaning of this Germanic adjective was “blinding, gleaming”, which may explain in part how why it ended up being used in English as the adjective blank.

Bosque: From the Old High German noun busk, it means “forest”. It is also a cognate of English bush and modern German Busch “shrub, thicket”.

Bregar: From Germanic brekan, it may signify “to work tirelessly on something”, “to quarrel with someone” or even “knead a bread dough in a certain fashion”. In modern German, brekan became brechen, lit. “to break or burst something”.

Brindis: From the German expression bring dir es, it means “toast” as the proposed salutation towards someone or something. The expression means “I offer/bring this to you”, in a celebratory or honoring way.

Búnker: from German Bunker, it means “hardened shelter” or “small fort”. The original noun has another meaning that was not taken into Spanish: “A certain type of storage room”.

Chucrut: From German Sauerkraut, it is an adapted loanword literally meaning “fermented cabbage”.

Delicatessen: from German Delikatessen, it literally means “delicate, fine food”. According to the dictionary from the Real Academia Española, this word must always be written in italics or—in quotations if italics is not available.

Escanciar: From Gothic skankjan, this verb may mean two related actions: “to pour a drink, especially an alcoholic one” and “to drink wine or other alcoholic beverage”. Skankjan was eventually transformed into the German verb schenken, that is, “to offer, to donate or to give as a gift”

Espía: From Gothic spaíha, espía has the same meaning as the English The noun’s origins can be traced back to Old High German spehōn, which in turn is related to Latin specere (to watch, to observe).

Espuela: From Gothic spaúra; it means “spur”. It goes back to the Old German sporo.

The post Spanish Words of Foreign Origin: Germanismos (Part 1) first appeared on Spanish Language Blog.

Colloquial Spanish Course – Love in Spanish

In this Spanish lesson we are going to learn about discussing and describing love in Spanish. First we will learn some relevant grammar and vocabulary and then see if you can follow a short audio conversation in Spanish. The transcript to the audio will be given at the end of the post but please try not to look at it until you have tried playing and understanding the audio a few times.

love in spanish

Image courtesy of Pixabay.com

Love in Spanish:

Amor: Love
Cariño: Love
Sentir cariño/amor por alguien: To feel love for somebody
Enamorarse de alguien: To fall in love with somebody
Estar enamorado/a de alguien: To be in love with somebody
Estar locamente enamorado/a de alguien: To be madly in love with somebody
Estar enamorado/a hasta las trancas: To be madly in love with somebody
Vida amorosa: Love life
Con todo mi cariño/amor: With all my love
Con mucho cariño/amor: With lots of love
Amor a primera vista: Love at first sight
Encontrar el amor verdadero: To find true love
Amor prohibido: Forbidden love
Amor platónico: Platonic love
Amor imposible: Imposible love
Hacer algo por amor: To do something for love
Por el amor de dios: For the love of God
Carta de amor: Love letter
Nido de amor: Love nest
Canción de amor: Love song
Historia de amor: Love story

Now play the audio to listen a conversation. Can you understand what is being said? Play the audio a few times before you look at the transcript. Don’t worry if you don’t understand every single thing the two people are saying. Try to catch whichever words you can and then try to piece things together to work out what is being said.

(Play the audio a few times before you scroll down and look at the transcript)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Transcript:

Carla: Cariño, estoy super emocionada por mañana.
Patrick: ¿Emocionada? ¿por qué?
Carla: Bueno, es un día muy especial, ¿no?
Patrick: Eh, sí sí claro.
Carla: ¿No te acuerdas? Pensaba que estabas locamente enamorado de mí.
Patrick: Claro Carla, estoy enamorado hasta las trancas de ti. Tengo una sorpresa muy especial para ti.
Carla: ¿De verdad? ¡Qué ganas tengo de que llegue mañana!
Patrick: Sí, vamos a celebrar tu cumpleaños de una manera espectacular.
Carla: ¿Mi cumpleaños? ¿Has dicho mi cumpleaños?
Patrick: No, no, me has entendido mal. He dicho nuestro aniversario de boda.
Carla: ¿Nuestro aniversario de boda? Por el amor de Dios Patrick, se te ha olvidado.
Patrick: Vale, sí. No tengo ni idea de qué día es mañana y no, no tengo ninguna sorpresa preparada.
Carla: Mañana en nuestro veinte aniversario del día que nos conocimos.
Patrick: Pero Carla, ¿cómo quieres que recuerde el día exacto que nos conocimos? Nadie recuerda eso.
Carla: ¿Cómo que no? Para mí fue un día muy especial. Amor a primera vista. Pensaba que para ti también. ¿Recuerdas que me escribiste una carta de amor?
Patrick: No, eso es imposible. Yo no escribo esas cosas.
Carla: ¡Patrick! ¡Qué dices! Mira, aquí tengo la carta.
Patrick. ¿La has guardado durante veinte años?
Carla: Sí, claro. Ya sabes lo romántica que soy. Y no es fácil encontrar el amor verdadero, pero nosotros lo encontramos y tenemos que celebrarlo.
Patrick: Tienes razón. Perdona que no sea muy romántico. Mañana vamos a hacer una celebración por todo lo alto.

 

So, how did you get on? How much did you understand of the listening? Please let me know in the comments section below…

Don’t worry if you didn’t understand that much, keep reviewing the vocabulary and phrases and you will soon be up to speed and ready for the next lesson in this course. See you next time!

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The post Colloquial Spanish Course – Love in Spanish first appeared on Spanish Language Blog.

Es esto correcto?

I'm trying to actually talk and use the Spanish I know, so I did some writing using my knowledge and very minimal google translate for some vocab words. Trying to figure out what I could maybe improve on, or if I'm correct so far! I speak it on a very basic level yet, and only wrote based on what I can say off the top off my head

Mi department de ahora no tiene un balcon, o comodidades Bueno. Yo no tengo tiempo a lavar platos. El sotano con lavadora es muy sucio y tiene insectos grandes. Quiero pagar mas dinero para un department con calidad alta. El departmento de nuevo tiene lavar de platos y lavadora en la casa.

Mis objectivos para esta mes:

*yo quiero escucho uno video todos dia en espanol

*yo debo empacer mis cosas para moverse a departmento nuevo. Tambien, como mas o todos mi comida en la cocina!

*escribe que yo se en espanol. Yo debo uso mi vocabulario. Voy a escribe todo semana.

*donar y vender mis ropas Antigua.

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We’re making a manga in really easy Spanish that is free to read.

Hey everyone, we're the Crystal Hunters team, and we're making a manga in really easy Spanish.

You only need to know 89 Spanish words to read our 100+ page manga of monsters and magic, and we also made a guide which helps you read and understand the whole manga from knowing zero Spanish. Both the manga and the guide are free to read.

The manga: Crystal Hunters

& the Spanish guide

There is also a free natural Spanish version, & a free easy English version you can use for translation.

Crystal Hunters is made by a team of two language teachers, two translators, and a pro manga artist. We had a lot of fun making this manga, but we're not sure if this is something everyone is interested in. Let us know what you think.

submitted by /u/Crystal_Hunters
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"Acá" vs. "Aquí" in the show "Dark"

Hey everyone! I've been watching the German Netflix original "Dark" with Spanish (Latin American) dubs, and I noticed that all the time everyone is saying "acá" instead of "aquí." Like, I'm not even sure that I've heard anyone say the word "aquí" on the show, even once.

I already know that "acá" is more like "over here" and "aquí" is more like "here," but can anyone tell me why they use acá almost exclusively? Does this resemble any particular Latin American dialect? Does it just make the characters sound very "small town" and colloquial? What kind of connotations does this use of "acá" give you, as native speakers?

Thanks!

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Colloquial Spanish Course – Partying in Spanish

In this Spanish lesson we are going to learn about partying in Spanish. First we will learn some relevant grammar and vocabulary and then see if you can follow a short audio conversation in Spanish. The transcript to the audio will be given at the end of the post but please try not to look at it until you have tried playing and understanding the audio a few times.

partying in spanish

Image courtesy of Pixabay.com

Partying in Spanish:

To have fun: Pasarlo bien
Nightlife: Vida nocturna
To make friends: Hacer amigos
Mate/Buddy/Pal: Colega
Girlfriend: Novia
Boyfriend: Novio
To meet new people: Conocer gente nueva
To socialise: Hacer vida social
Date: Cita
Party: Fiesta
House party: Jarana
A great party: Fiestón
A terrible party: Fiesta horrible
Drinking in the street: Botellón
Party animal: Calavera
It’s good: Es bueno
It’s cool: Está guay / genial
It’s awesome: Es la bomba
It’s uncool: Es cutre
It’s terrible: Es un horror
Let’s go for a drink: Vamos a tomar algo
To have a drink: Tomar una copa
Do you feel like a few drinks?: ¿Te apetece tomar algo?
Do you have a light?: ¿Tienes fuego?
Cheers!: ¡Salud!
A toast: Un brindis
Bottoms up!: ¡Arriba, abajo, al centro, y pa’ adentro!
Drink! Drink!: ¡Traga! ¡Traga!
Sober: Sobrio/a
To be tipsy: Estar alegre / Llevar un puntillo
Drunk: Borracho/a
To be really drunk: Estar como una cuba
Dizzy: Mareado/a
To be nauseous: Tener ganas de devolver
I am feeling sick: Tengo naúseas
To vomit: Devolver / Potar
To pass out: Desmayarse
Hangover: Resaca
I am hungover: Tengo resaca
Bad hangover: Resacón

Now play the audio to listen a conversation. Can you understand what is being said? Play the audio a few times before you look at the transcript. Don’t worry if you don’t understand every single thing the two people are saying. Try to catch whichever words you can and then try to piece things together to work out what is being said.

(Play the audio a few times before you scroll down and look at the transcript)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Transcript:

Susana: Harry ¿vas a salir esta noche?
Harry: No lo creo, no me apetece mucho.
Susana: Venga Harry, ya sé que no conoces mucha gente en Madrid pero salir de copas es la mejor forma de conocer gente nueva.
Harry: No me interesa mucho hacer amigos.
Susana: Deberías hacer más vida social.
Harry: No de verdad, gracias. Me aburro de fiesta.
Susana: Lo que tienes que hacer es bailar y ya no te aburres.
Harry: No gracias. No sé bailar. No me gusta.
Susana: Pues tómate una copa.
Harry: No, mañana tengo que trabajar y no me gusta trabajar con resaca.
Susana: No, no. No me refiero a beber tanto que estés como una cuba. Una copa o dos.
Harry: No, de verdad. Te agradezco mucho que quieras animarme. Pero no me gusta salir de copas. Me parece muy cutre.
Susana: ¿Cutre? Pues a mí me encanta la vida nocturna. Me lo paso muy bien. Bailo, conozco a gente nueva… ¡Está genial!
Harry: Bueno es que todos tenemos gustos diferentes. Yo prefiero quedarme en casa y jugar a videojuegos.
Susana: ¿A videojuegos? ¿Pero eso no es de niños?
Harry: ¡Qué dices Susana! Yo tengo unos videojuegos buenísimos y juego online con otras personas. Hago muchos amigos así.
Susana: Mmm. Parece interesante.
Harry: ¿Quieres venir a mi casa y jugamos un rato?
Susana: Vale, venga.

 

So, how did you get on? How much did you understand of the listening? Please let me know in the comments section below…

Don’t worry if you didn’t understand that much, keep reviewing the vocabulary and phrases and you will soon be up to speed and ready for the next lesson in this course. See you next time!

Want to hear more? Sign up for one of our newsletters!

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The post Colloquial Spanish Course – Partying in Spanish first appeared on Spanish Language Blog.